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Архив рубрики: Библиография

[книги] Монголия в трудах Я.П. Шишмарева

Монголия в трудах генерального консула Российской империи в Урге Я.П. Шишмарева (4.5 Мб, pdf). Некоторые мысли о праве России на Амур в документах и публикациях : (к 160-летию Генерального консульства России в Монголии) / сост. А. И. Шинковой, Ю. В. Кузьмин. — Иркутск : Изд. дом БГУ, 2021. — 342 с.

Книга посвящена дипломатической и исследовательской деятельности генерального консула России в Монголии Якова Парфеньевича Шишмарева. В сборник включены публикации Я. П. Шишмарева и документы, описывающие его дипломатическую деятельность в период Амурской экспедиции.

[книги] Буддизм и национализм во Внутренней Азии

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Вышла наша коллективная монография: Буддизм и национализм во    Внутренней Азии. Авторы: Ирина Гарри, Рустам Сабиров, Николай  Цыремпилов, Джордж Дрейфус, Шэнь Вэйчжун, Йохан Эльверског, Бато   Дондуков, Владимир Родионов, Аня Бернштейн.

«Книга посвящена исследованию буддизма Внутренней Азии в контексте   вызовов эпохи модерна (modernity) и одной из главных ее идей —   национализма. В ней показаны различные сценарии и формы взаимодействия   буддийской религии и политики, религиозных институтов и государственной   власти, определяется роль традиции тибето-монгольского буддизма в   национальном строительстве Республики Монголия и буддийских регионов   России и Китая — Бурятии и Тибета, анализируются ответы и реакции   буддийских общин на вызовы модернизации и глобализации».

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[books] Buddhists, Shamans, and Soviets

quijadaJustine Buck Quijada. Buddhists, Shamans, and Soviets. Rituals of History in Post-Soviet Buryatia
«History in the Soviet Union was a political project. From the Soviet perspective, Buryats, an indigenous Siberian ethnic group, were a «backwards» nationality that was carried along on the inexorable march towards the Communist utopian future. When the Soviet Union ended, the Soviet version of history lost its power and Buryats, like other Siberian indigenous peoples, were able to revive religious and cultural traditions that had been suppressed by the Soviet state. In the process, they also recovered knowledge about the past that the Soviet Union had silenced. Borrowing the analytic lens of the chronotope from Bakhtin, Quijada argues that rituals have chronotopes which situate people within time and space. As they revived rituals, Post-Soviet Buryats encountered new historical information and traditional ways of being in time that enabled them to re-imagine the Buryat past, and what it means to be Buryat. Through the temporal perspective of a reincarnating Buddhist monk, Dashi-Dorzho Etigelov, Buddhists come to see the Soviet period as a test on the path of dharma. Shamanic practitioners, in contrast, renegotiate their relationship to the past by speaking to their ancestors through the bodies of shamans. By comparing the versions of history that are produced in Buddhist, shamanic and civic rituals, Buddhists, Shamans and Soviets offers a new lens for analyzing ritual, a new perspective on how an indigenous people grapples with a history of state repression, and an innovative approach to the ethnographic study of how people know about the past».

Conversation with the author.

[book] Buddhism in Dialogue with Contemporary Societies

Buddhism in Dialogue with Contemporary SocietiesBuddhism in Dialogue with Contemporary Societies. Carola Roloff, Wolfram Weiße, Michael Zimmermann (Editor)

With contributions by
Bhikkhu Bodhi, Bhikkhunī Dhammadinnā, Jay L. Garfield, Huimin Bhikshu, Karma Lekshe Tsomo, Sallie B. King, Volker Küster, Miao Guang, Thea Mohr, Mario Poceski, Yangsi Rinpoche, Jan-Ulrich Sobisch, Sander G. Tideman, André Van der Braak, Michael von Brück, B. Alan Wallace

«The growing pluralization of religion and culture in Europe means that we encounter an increasing number of Buddhist immigrants as well as ‘Western’ converts. Against this background, in June 2018, the Academy of World Religions and the Numata Center for Buddhist Studies at the University of Hamburg (Germany), invited scholars of Theravāda, East Asian and Tibetan Buddhism. The questions discussed referred to:
— Does Buddhism matter today? What can it contribute?
— Must Buddhism adapt to the modern world? How can Buddhism adapt to a non-Asia context?
— When Buddhism travels, what must be preserved if Buddhism is to remain Buddhism?

The contributions in this volume show not only that Buddhism matters in the West but that it already has its strong impact on our societies. Therefore, universities in Europe should include Buddhist theories and techniques in their curricula.»

[books] Sources of Mongolian Buddhism

sourcesSources of Mongolian Buddhism. Edited by Vesna A. Wallace.

«Despite Mongolia’s centrality to East Asian history and culture, Mongols themselves have often been seen as passive subjects on the edge of the Qing formation or as obedient followers of so-called «Tibetan Buddhism,» peripheral to major literary, religious, and political developments. But in fact Mongolian Buddhists produced multi-lingual and genre-bending scholastic and ritual works that profoundly shaped historical consciousness, community identification, religious knowledge, and practices in Mongolian lands and beyond. In Sources of Mongolian Buddhism, a team of leading Mongolian scholars and authors have compiled a collection of original Mongolian Buddhist works—including ritual texts, poetic prayers and eulogies, legends, inscriptions, and poems—for the first time in any European language.»

  • Features original Mongolian Buddhist texts never before translated into English
  • Introduces a fresh approach to understanding Tibeto-Mongolian Buddhism through primary sources
  • Offers literature from the seventeenth century to the present

[книги] Боо и Бон: Древние шаманские традиции Сибири и Тибета в их отношении к учениям центральноазиатского будды

Дмитрий Ермаков. Боо и Бон: Древние шаманские традиции Сибири и Тибета в их отношении к учениям центральноазиатского будды. Книга 1. Издательство «Пальмира», 2020.
Издательская аннотация:
«Книга современного исследователя тибетского бона Дмитрия Ермакова, в которой рассказывается о древних шаманских традициях Сибири и Тибета — бурятском боо мургэла и тибетском боне — в их отношении к учениям центральноазиатского будды. Она может быть одинаково полезной как для ученых, так и для практикующих бон, тибетский буддизм и шаманизм».

[books] Building a Religious Empire

Building a Religious Empire

Brenton Sullivan. Building a Religious Empire. Tibetan Buddhism, Bureaucracy, and the Rise of the Gelukpa

The vast majority of monasteries in Tibet and nearly all of the monasteries in Mongolia belong to the Geluk school of Tibetan Buddhism, best known through its symbolic head, the Dalai Lama. Historically, these monasteries were some of the largest in the world, and even today some Geluk monasteries house thousands of monks, both in Tibet and in exile in India. In Building a Religious Empire, Brenton Sullivan examines the school’s expansion and consolidation of power along the frontier with China and Mongolia from the mid-seventeenth through the mid-eighteenth centuries to chart how its rise to dominance took shape.
In contrast to the practice in other schools of Tibetan Buddhism, Geluk lamas devoted an extraordinary amount of effort to establishing the institutional frameworks within which everyday aspects of monastic life, such as philosophizing, meditating, or conducting rituals, took place. In doing so, the lamas drew on administrative techniques usually associated with state-making—standardization, record-keeping, the conscription of young males, and the concentration of manpower in central cores, among others—thereby earning the moniker «lama official,» or «Buddhist bureaucrat.»

The deployment of these bureaucratic techniques to extend the Geluk «liberating umbrella» over increasing numbers of lands and peoples leads Sullivan to describe the result of this Geluk project as a «religious empire.» The Geluk lamas’ privileging of the monastic institution, Sullivan argues, fostered a common religious identity that insulated it from factionalism and provided legitimacy to the Geluk project of conversion, conquest, and expansion. Ultimately, this system succeeded in establishing a relatively uniform and resilient network of thousands of monasteries stretching from Nepal to Lake Baikal, from Beijing to the Caspian Sea.»

[book] A Monastery on the Move

A Monastery on the Move: Art and Politics in Later Buddhist Mongolia

Uranchimeg Tsultemin. A Monastery on the Move: Art and Politics in Later Buddhist Mongolia.

«In 1639, while the Géluk School of the Fifth Dalai Lama and Qing emperors vied for supreme authority in Inner Asia, Zanabazar (1635–1723), a young descendent of Chinggis Khaan, was proclaimed the new Jebtsundampa ruler of the Khalkha Mongols. Over the next three centuries, the ger (yurt) erected to commemorate this event would become the mobile monastery Ikh Khüree, the political seat of the Jebtsundampas and a major center of Mongolian Buddhism. When the monastery and its surrounding structures were destroyed in the 1930s, they were rebuilt and renamed Ulaanbaatar, the modern-day capital of Mongolia.

Based on little-known works of Mongolian Buddhist art and architecture, A Monastery on the Move presents the intricate and colorful history of Ikh Khüree and of Zanabazar, himself an eminent artist. Author Uranchimeg Tsultemin makes the case for a multifaceted understanding of Mongol agency during the Géluk’s political ascendancy and the Qing appropriation of the Mongol concept of dual rulership (shashin tör) as the nominal “Buddhist Government.” In rich conversation with heretofore unpublished textual, archeological, and archival sources (including ritualized oral histories), Uranchimeg argues that the Qing emperors’ “Buddhist Government” was distinctly different from the Mongol vision of sovereignty, which held Zanabazar and his succeeding Jebtsundampa reincarnates to be Mongolia’s rightful rulers. This vision culminated in their independence from the Qing and the establishment of the Jebtsundampa’s theocractic government in 1911.

A groundbreaking work, A Monastery on the Move provides a fascinating, in-depth analysis and interpretation of Mongolian Buddhist art and its role in shaping borders and shifting powers in Inner Asia.»

[books] Mobility and Displacement

Mobility and Displacement : Nomadism, Identity and Postcolonial Narratives in Mongolia book cover
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Orhon Myadar. Mobility and Displacement. Nomadism, Identity and Postcolonial Narratives in Mongolia.

«This book explores and contests both outsiders’ projections of Mongolia and the self-objectifying tropes Mongolians routinely deploy to represent their own country as a land of nomads.

It speaks to the experiences of many societies and cultures that are routinely treated as exotic, romantic, primitive or otherwise different and Other in Euro-American imaginaries, and how these imaginaries are also internally produced by those societies themselves. The assumption that Mongolia is a nomadic nation is largely predicated upon Mongolia’s environmental and climatic conditions, which are understood to make Mongolia suitable for little else than pastoral nomadism. But to the contrary, the majority of Mongolians have been settled in and around cities and small population centers. Even Mongolians who are herders have long been unable to move freely in a smooth space, as dictated by the needs of their herds, and as they would as free-roaming «nomads.» Instead, they have been subjected to various constraints across time that have significantly limited their movement. The book weaves threads from disparate branches of Mongolian studies to expose various visible and invisible constraints on population mobility in Mongolia from the Qing period to the post-socialist era.  

With its in-depth analysis of the complexities of the relationship between land rights, mobility, displacement, and the state, the book makes a valuable contribution to the fields of cultural geography, political geography, heritage and culture studies, as well as Eurasian and Inner-Asian Studies.»

[Book] Politics and Literature in Mongolia (1921-1948)

Politics and Literature in Mongolia (1921-1948)Simon Wickhamsmith. Politics and Literature in Mongolia (1921-1948).
«Politics and Literature in Mongolia (1921-1948) investigates the relationship between literature and politics during Mongolia’s early revolutionary period. Between the 1921 socialist revolution and the first Writers’ Congress held in April 1948, the literary community constituted a key resource in the formation and implementation of policy. At the same time, debates within the party, discontent among the population, and questions of religion and tradition led to personal and ideological conflict among the intelligentsia and, in many cases, to trials and executions. Using primary texts, many of them translated into English for the first time, Simon Wickhamsmith shows the role played by the literary arts — poetry, fiction and drama — in the complex development of the ‘new society’, helping to bring Mongolia’s nomadic herding population into the utopia of equality, industrial progress and social well-being promised by the Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party.»